Posts Tagged ‘living plastic free’

Plastic Free July Day 30

57. Fish wrapper

Plastic Free July

I bought fish for dinner. It came wrapped in plastic. Considering that the last time I went direct to the fishmonger and asked if the fish was sustainable and was given a blank look by the 14 year old school kid behind the counter, I didn’t have high hopes of pulling off the reusable container stunt from when I got pork mince. Also, convenience.

58. cheese wrapper

Plastic Free July

Cheese comes wrapped in plastic. Unless it’s a whole round that is dipped in wax. I can’t eat 30kg of cheese in one sitting. The only place that I remember which used to wrap smallish rounds in wax is Tilba Real Dairy, but that was a long time ago.

59. Bulk teabags

Plastic Free July

My other half likes a particular brand of tea. Even if bought in bulk, plastic is involved. I have also heard that some teabag manufacturers use plastic in the teabag “weave”, or some plastic to non-staple the tag to the tea bag.

On the plus side, I attended a little workshop on how to make beeswax wraps using just beeswax and an iron. Not recommended to use beeswax wraps on fish though.

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Plastic Free July Day 28

47-53. Zip lock bags

Plastic Free July

I went to the markets to buy sourdough bread. I can’t really eat a whole loaf of bread quickly enough before it goes stale, so I have to freeze some of it. I used to use single use cling film/plastic film/sarin wrap to wrap my loaves of bread up in before freezing, but I have recently shifted to zip locks, because at least they are sort of reusable. But I guess the question is:

Which has less impact: aluminium foil or a zip lock plastic bag?

I think aluminium foil has a larger energy footprint to produce. Generally though, you can really only use it once before it tears. But the foil itself *is* recyclable, if it’s clean and as long as your country’s waste system actually recycles it.

A plastic bag is petrochemical derived. A zip lock bag I can reuse multiple times. Again, it *is* recyclable, if it’s clean and as long as your country’s waste system actually recycles it.

What would you do?

Buying bread on a “as needs” basis isn’t really an option, because sometimes I just get super busy and I just need something in the freezer to pull out if I need to.

Plastic Free July Days 25-26

45. sponge cake plastic wrapper
46. plastic bag for a takeaway bun

Plastic Free July

I am in a different location to normal for a two day conference. I have had to get up stupid early to get public transport to this alternate location. I refuse to get a bacon and egg roll from the fast food joint at the train station, but two blocks away I am now hungry. I buy the egg white sponge for my mum because she likes it, and it comes in a plastic wrapper. I have bought a sweet bun to eat for my second breakfast, also served in a plastic bag. This latter bag is reused to take home some extra cake from the conference. I don’t buy lunch the first day because everything in the food courts is served up on a plastic plate.

On the second day, I get that bacon and egg roll. At least it’s wrapped in something resembling paper.

Plastic Free July Day 13

24. Wrapper from drink box straw
25. Straw from single use drink box (not shown)
26. Bread wrapper

Plastic Free July

I’m torn about the drink box. It is convenient to have a milk drink at the ready when you are cycling around the neighbourhood and need hydration. But then it comes with a straw, and a straw wrapper. I suppose that I could get a 1L milk box, and pour it into a reusable glass bottle. But the 1 milk box itself has a plastic lid (and the questionability over whether or not a tetra pak can actually be recycled in Australia). I really don’t have any storage space in the fridge. And washing the milk remnants out of a glass bottle can be tricky – it does smell when it goes off; and a lot of the ‘seals’ in glass bottle lids end up losing their effectiveness over time – and guess what, the seals are plastic based. So really, the only remedy is to wait until I get home and pour glass of milk (out of a large 2L plastic bottle). Or get a cow. I can’t win.

If I buy a single serve snacky bread product, it is placed in a paper bag. Buy four… free plastic bag. I suppose I could have insisted on paper bags, but I hadn’t brought a reusable shopping bag with me, and it was going to be a trial to carry four individual paper bags home without dropping them.

Plastic Free July Day 11

21: Foil tray & cling film wrapping from a takeaway dinner

Plastic free July

It had been a long day. I didn’t feel like cooking. So I popped past a thai grocery store to pick up a already cooked tilapia fish with a clear spicy dipping sauce. It came in this packaging. I washed the foil container & hid it. That will be reused for my solar beeswax extractor during summer. The plastic bag will be reused as a bin liner. The sauce container, once I’ve used up all the sauce, will be reused.

Plastic Free July Day 9

18. Block of cheese (wrapper)
19. Cling wrap (sarin wrap), to portion the cheese into two.

Plastic free July

It’s a bit hard to buy cheese without plastic in Australia. I could go to a deli and buy it cut off a large block, but it gets handed to me in a plastic lined paper. I suppose I could provide the deli with a container to put my cheese into.

This block of cheese I cut in half to eat over a fortnight or so. I could’ve used a beeswax wrap or a container, but my partner likes his cling wrap, and hates containers.

Plastic Free July Day 8

I wanted to buy some bread, but had 3 minutes before my bus and a long journey home.

17. Plastic lined bread wrapper

Plastic Free July

If I go direct to the bakery, and buy their sourdough, it is picked up off the shelf and placed in a paper bag. But if I buy the same product from one of their distributers, it is pre-packaged in a plastic lined bag, with a little plastic window to show you the look of the bread.

I think I’ll need to rename this series of posts “my plastics for the month of July”.