Posts Tagged ‘harvest monday’

Harvest Monday and Garden Update, March 2017

Welcome to Harvest Monday, where we celebrate all things harvest related.

February clicked over into March, and our stinking hot summer suddenly turned wet. It has rained and rained and rained. Couldn’t go outside because it was too hot; suddenly became couldn’t go outside because it was too wet. We lurched from an energy crisis (when industrial load had the potential to overlap with domestic “everyone gets home and switches the air-con on” load), to a severe storm and flood crisis.

The advantage of all this rain is that purslane has been popping up in my front lawn/dirt patch. Apparently, purslane grows in highly compacted soils (like mine) and is high in omega-3 fatty acids (this is new to me). Yay! I stir fried this with cabbage, and also added some to a cucumber salsa:

Cucumber salsa

Diced cucumber, pear, random herbs (parsley, chives, tarragon etc), s&p, apple cider vinegar & olive oil. Pretty simple!

I have never really understood the point behind a cucumber. Apart from turning it into a pickle, or eating it in a salad, what is the reason behind its existence? Then I found this salsa recipe in The Cook’s Companion, supposed to be an accompaniment to smoked fish… and I couldn’t stop making it, or eating it.

The armenian cucumber came from the February crop and swap event. I haven’t seen it in the shops before, I liked the taste, so I saved a few seeds to try and grow next season. The marigolds (edible flowers), also came from a crop swap event.

I checked on my bananas earlier in the week, and it appears that I had left them on the tree for too long. They’ve been forming since November, so about three months of ripening. After trimming the hand, clearing off the rotten bits, shooing away the cockroaches and the slugs, and cutting off the slightly nibbled bananas, here we have it.

Roll up, roll up, for the world’s smallest banana harvest!

World's smallest banana harvest

This is 1kg (including skins). Each banana was the size of your little finger, about 5cm or 2 inches long. They were very sweet. I couldn’t eat them all at once, and if I left them in the house unattended for more than a minute, he would throw them out.

Approx 400g tomatoes (no photo). I still have a few more left on the vine, but it is the last gasp of the summer crop. I must not plant tomatoes next year, I really need to give the beds a break.

Approx 10g random curcubit flowers.

The male flowers keep falling off the vine after they’ve done their thing. It seems a waste to let the snails get to them, so I have been adding them to stir fries like zucchini flowers.

Around the garden:

Random curcubit

My random curcubit is still going strong. I originally had three plants pop up in the full sun garden bed, and I transplanted two of the plants to the other two beds. They are taking over where the tomato plants are dying off. I still haven’t identified it, except that it is definitely not a cucumber or a pumpkin.

Random curcubit

I’m thinking winter melon or luffa. Any ideas?

I killed my two cherry trees, which makes me sad. I think over enthusiastic grass trimming killed the roots.

I killed the native raspberry (too much heat when I planted it), but hopefully I have a lead on raspberry or youngberry canes to plant.

I started putting in some seedlings for autumn/winter. I had a bet each way – kohlrabi (cold crop), okra (in case the hot weather continues), and red rosso onion (seeds slightly out of date, hopefully I get some germination).

I am also hoping that this plant:

Papaya?

is the germination of a papaya? There have been guesses for sweet potato, or papaya, but no firm consensus yet. Ignore the red stems, that purslane lurking underneath. What do you think, dear reader?

Harvest Monday, 12 Feb 2017

We are in the middle of a long hot summer. Bats, baby turtles are dying. Not joking. On one day the records were broken, and then we went and broke them again the next day. The cycle is of 4-5 days in the high 30’s (deg C or 95 F+), followed by a 1-2 days in the low to mid 30’s – whereupon it feels positively nippy; and then it repeats. Last weekend, it got to 45 deg C (113 F). It has been horrendous. My garden hates it. I’ve had to rig up shadecloth over the tomatoes; but every time a flower on my random curcubit opens, it keels over and the flower falls off the stem. So it is still a mystery plant.

756 g tomatoes, 200g basil

Harvest Monday 12 Feb 2017

They look pretty; but the taste, not so much. I tried to harvest them in the early morning, such that it was close to 24 hours since I had watered them. I originally picked them to give to a colleague who had been inspired by my tales of sugo making from the last batch, but she wasn’t at work on the friday. So.

My friend is a member of a community garden, and posted photos of her harvesting this amazing looking genovese basil. My basil is a tough mediterranean type that survives winter frosts, but is less green and leafy. It is always in flower, and I can’t bear to cut it back because the bees love it so much. I swapped a 500g jar of honey for the basil.

So I turned the tomatoes and basil into fresh tomato and basil pasta for dinner (using fresh pasta from the markets), and enough for lunch the next day. I didn’t have any balsamic vinegar, so I used a combo of apple cider vinegar and guava vinegar.

The next 100g or so of basil I turned into fresh pesto, with pine nuts and a little lemon juice to try and keep the vibrant green colour.


Curry leaves:

Curry leaves

Not mine, my neighbour’s. He was cutting back his curry leaf plant, and offered me some cuttings. I tried to plant them – but I mentioned this stinking hot weather, right? They didn’t take. So I am currently drying them for later use. They have (to me) an unusual peppery herbaceous taste. I’ve used some leaves to flavour kombucha, as well as make a “curry leaf pesto”. It’s got that peppery taste!

Harvest Monday

I have had 1-2 tomatoes so far, all with grubs, but this was the first time I harvested a big lot of them. Ok, so there was a caterpillar munching on one, and evidence of more caterpillar breakfast on another but here is 800g of grosse lisse:

Monday harvest

I had three of them in a slow cooked ‘shakshuska’ breakfast, except that I was so distracted, I forgot to add the egg.

I’m thinking of bringing out my inner wog, and turning the rest of the harvest into my very own passata.

Add various harvestings of thyme, lemon thyme, rosemary and mint.

The cucumbers (300g) are from my neighbour, she’s such a gem!

I don’t know if this is an old wives tale, but she says that if you harvest them in the full heat of the day, it makes them sour. Thoughts?

Harvest Monday, 3 October 2016

I’ve been a little quiet on the Monday Harvest posts. Firstly because I’m such a lazy gardener, hardly anything gets planted, thus hardly anything gets harvested.

Right now, I have been “harvesting” bindi. You have to admire the tenacity of the weed. The seeds have a seven year life, and if you accidentally let them get to maturity, the 10+ seeds scatter if you try and dig them out, or they attach themselves to the bottom of your bike tyre/shoe/foot, resulting in the “bindi dance”, as you leap from one ouch to another.

So actual edibles harvest harvest. Mulberries:

Mulberries

Foraged/scrumped from a tree down the road. This brings back memories of turning up late to early morning uni (college) lectures, because I had detoured past the ripening mulberry tree. My hands, of course, were dyed purple as evidence of my dalliance with the fruit tree.

About 4 spears of asparagus.

Parsley and mint. I have a lot of parsley, from when it seeded a few years ago. I have been using a lot of fresh parsley and mint in salads. I have a parsley “lawn”, and every time he trims the lawn, we get tabouli.

Honey!!

Honeycomb

This is the first honey of the season. I only managed to harvest one frame from the batbox bee hive, and this yielded about 5 boxes of honey comb (approx 2.4kg) and one jar of honey with “bits” (approx 500g). This was taken in early September, and only today did I cut the honeycomb up and place it into boxes, mainly to get the plastic crate holding the one frame of honey out of the kitchen.

Planted.
Pepino Melon. Got this one from a cutting during the sustainable house day event at Moss House. Silly me didn’t plant this for about a week after I got it (refer lazy gardener above), and then I chucked it into the south facing bed and forgot to water it.

Sweet pea. It’s getting a bit late in the season for peas, but I had to try. These went into the sunny (relocated) garden bed, with the brussels sprouts and potatoes that I can’t get rid of. A young lady was selling plants at the Moss House open garden to help get herself to Vietnam for some volunteerism (volunteer tourism), and a punnet of pea seedlings was my contribution.

Kohlrabi. My neighbour gave me some seedlings at the beginning of winter. I waited until the end of winter to plant about half of them. I really need to make more time for this gardening business

Native Australian Raspberry.
Probably Rubus rosafolius or maybe Rubus moluccanus. I got this from a crop and swap group, where I swapped a jar of honey, and got some native raspberry canes. I again didn’t plant for a few days. And then didn’t read the instructions about planting with stinky manure in the bottom of the trench. Whoops. I planted it along a north facing metal fence, where the rosebush, oregano, asparagus and rhubarb live.

Battled:

Aphids, aphids, aphids. I got them in my brussels sprouts, kale (cavolo nero), rosebushes and spring onions (scallions). It’s horrendous. I’ve been trying to battle them by squashing them, but the ants keep putting them back. It’s also really hard with the brussels sprouts trying to develop, but I’m tearing the young nodules apart trying to get to the aphids which are hiding inside. I don’t think I’m going to be getting brussels sprouts this year.

Long, Hot Summer

Sydney has just had its longest run of hot weather, with 39 days in a row of temperatures over 26 degrees Celsius

In the western suburbs, where my garden is, it has generally been above 30 deg C.

The poor garden has definitely felt the brunt of this. I got blossom end rot in the zucchini plant, apparently caused by infrequent watering (and a plague of slugs). One half of the double graft mini royal/royal lee cherry tree got cooked. The regular starkrimson cherry tree lost most of its leaves. Another north-facing rhubarb plant, never very strong, bit the dust.

It’s April, and the days are *still* hitting the high 20s, let alone the hottest April day since 1986.

So…even if our government denies the existence of climate change/global warming by repealing the carbon tax, I’m not so sure.

In other news, to make this a harvest monday post:

Lemongrass

Lemongrass! I had to cut the lemongrass back to reduce the number of hiding places for the slugs and snails, and give a little more light for the rhubarb. What to do? Let’s chop into usable sections and freeze for later.

Harvest Monday 7 March 2016

1 x tomato, from a plant planted by my neighbour.
1 x bolero apple. It tasted kind of mushy – a bit like a golden delicious.

I’m working on a post that tells you all of what I have harvested this summer, but since that’s still in progress, I figure short n sweet is the go.

Harvest Monday march 2016

Summer in the Garden, 2015

After my most recent visit to the USA, and driving around the Santa Rosa wine country area, I was really inspired to dig my rogue grapevine out of the planter box, and trellis it and use it as a “living fence” out the front of the box. But I couldn’t dig it out of the planter box. I guess the roots go deeper than you think.

So I trellised it in place:

South facing planter box

I didn’t really want to stick opposing stakes in the ground to give the trellis tension, so I just used garden stakes to give the thing rigidity. (The grapevine is hidden behind the self seeding parsley)

Two apples, one per columnar:

Two apples

These are really delicate. You touch one to stick a fruit fly exclusion bag on it, and the fruit falls off. I’ve already lost two fruit on the

Zucchini:

Zucchini

Yes, I bought this as a seedling. It’s planted in the relocated garden bed, but although it gets lovely sun in the winter, it has a lot of sun in summer. The zucchini leaves do wilt a bit during the heat of the day. Perhaps a deciduous tree to the north of the planter box?

Not much else is happening. I’ve managed to keep the rhubarb alive; the one in the south facing planter box in front of the grapevine is doing quite well, probably because it is quite well shaded by the lemongrass. It is doing much better than the rhubarb that is facing north. I got a mere six or so asparagus from my two crowns. I had let the ferns grow throughout winter, so I’m not sure what I didn’t do. Perhaps I was meant to fertilise?