Posts Tagged ‘brewing’

Pineapple Tepache

Fermenting using fruit scraps.

First encountered through a facebook homebrew group – recipe from Mary Izett’s Speed Brewing.

Comment was that the brew was left for too long, and the end result was like a bad homebrew. The advice was to “brew on thursday, drink on saturday”.

A few months later, I bought a pineapple. Rather than compost or put into the landfill the outer skin, I decided to try my hand at pineapple tepache. Recipe is based upon Sharon Flynn’s Ferment for Good cos I’m lazy.

Skin scraps of one pineapple
2 tablespoons of golden syrup
1 tsp tamarind paste
1-2 star anise (whole)
1/2 cinnamon stick
Water to cover (approx 1.5 litre in my jar)

This was brewed in my house with an average ambient temperature of 25 deg C (77 F).

Tepache at 0 hours:
tepache 0hours

It smells sweet, like pineapple.

Tepache at 24 hours:

tepache 24hours

There is some fizz action going on. At 24 hours it tastes like a ‘dry’ mineral water (like a champagne can be ‘dry’), with a pineapple nose.

Tepache at 48 hours:

tepache 48hours

Wow, look at that head! You can see by the watermark that the fizz has been at a higher level in the brew vessel and then subsided. At 48 hours it has more fizz and a more alcoholic aftertaste. The brew has started to attract the vinegar flies.

Tepache at 56 hours:

tepache 56hours

I started to decant the wine at this point. Forgetting that it takes ages to separate through my coffee filters, decanting/separating takes another 8 hours. So total brew time got to 64 hours.

I gave up at this point, and switched to using a metal tea ball – that keeps most of the bits out. I’ve added a little more golden syrup to my bottle and a piece of pineapple to “keep it real”. It’s starting to taste on the sour side. It’s probably beyond saving, but I’ll add a little more sugar to the bottle and keep in in the fridge.

Next time if I brewed this again (and why not, it was so much fun!), I would stop the fermentation at 24 hours and use more sugar in the original mix; alternatively let it go all the way to vinegar. Pineapple vinegar!

What about you, dear reader? Have you got an innovative way to reduce your food waste and make something tasty?

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Learning to brew

When you “make” honey (after you extract the honey from the honeycomb), you are left with a sticky mess of wax and honey. I then wash this wax mixture so I can then refine the wax from the propolis and other bee related items. It feels so wasteful to then throw away this honey water (honey washings), that I tried several times to make mead. But each time, I made vinegar. I then went out and bought a bottle of mead to see the end product that I was aiming for: and I did not like it .

Oh dear.

Now what?

Then up popped an ad for a beer brewing workshop at the cornersmith picklery. Sold!

The beer brewing kit that is readily available in Australia is kind of like mixing cordial. Add substances A, B, C to water, let sit (brew) for 7 days then decant into your bottles, adding a carbonation ‘drop’ (dextrose sugar tablet) to each bottle.

The brewing method at this workshop was the next step along, where you might select the hoppiness of your brew by selecting the type of hops, and how long your brew your mixture for.

We were guided by Chris Sidwa of Batch Brewing in the method of extract brewing, which is a little more hands on than cordial brewing.

He ran through the importance of sterilisation, the difference that the type of hops makes to the flavour profile, as well as how long it is boiled and when it is added to the mixture.

Working in groups of 3, we got our 3 litres worth of water per person boiling, before adding the light malt extract, stirring to prevent the sugar burning on the bottom, or the foam exploding out of the top.

malt:

Malt

Cascade Hops:

Cascade Hops

These hops were developed by Oregon State University, and is one of the few freely available non-trademarked variety of hops. We added these at the -30 minute mark, and at the -5 minute mark. Everything is measured in terms of “time from ending the boil”.

You pack your hops into a double muslin bag, so that you can remove it from the brew when you put into the fermentation vessel.

Wrapped in muslin:

Hop bag

Bubble, bubble, toil and trouble:

Brew

The process of boiling is to drive off unwanted flavours and remove bitterness. The reason the second lot of hops is added is to add the hoppy flavour back into the brew.

After adding the second lot of hops, we divided the mixture into our brew buckets, and enjoyed a small taster of Batch Brewing’s American Pale Ale, sourdough, cucumber pickles and capsicum (sweet pepper) relish.

We got to take our fermenting buckets home with us, and issued with a second set of instructions.

I didn’t think this one through:

Public transport

After carrying my brewing and decanting buckets home on the train (Luckily I didn’t have my pushbike, unlike one of the other attendees), we were instructed to add 3-4 litres of cooled boiling water and let brew for 7 days.

Recipe (makes approx 5 L):
3 litres boiling water
840 g malt after the ‘hot break’
1 x 30g hops @ -30 minutes
1 x 30g hops @ -5 minutes
Place mixture into your brew bucket.
Cool to approx 20 C
3g yeast (US-05)
3L chilled boiled water*.
Let brew for 7 days in a constant temperature environment, about 20 deg C, away from sunlight
35g dextrose into sterilised bottling bucket
Decant from brewing bucket into bottling bucket, leave yeast cake behind
Decant from bottling bucket into each bottle – gently – you don’t want the yeast to get all excited and foamy
Leave a little headroom (equivalent to your bottling wand)
Cap the bottles.

I had trouble capping the bottles with the supplied ‘hand capper’.

I left the lids on top of the bottles for a day to keep contaminants out, whilst I looked around to borrow someone else’s bench capper. I ended up buying one second hand.

Capped (L), Uncapped (R):

Capping

Considering the amount of force required to push the cap onto the bottle even with the benchtop capper, there is no way that I could have made the hand capper work. No wonder they are known as the deathstick in the industry!

Buy one bench capper, receive microbrew kit for free, BOGOF:


Bench capper


This was not my intention, to gain the equivalent of three home brew kegs in the space of 8 days! I’m going to have to try this recipe again, because instead of the second lot of chilled boiled water, I added honey washings which I had boiled (pastuerised). Note to self – if you do this, the beer may need to ferment for a longer period of time. This style of beer is called a braggot.


Braggot

A few months later, I did try my beer. I was left with 1/4 in the bottle, as the other 3/4 ended up all over the kitchen walls, floor and counter. Yep, it was still fermenting in the bottle. I was lucky it didn’t explode! The result was very tasty, but highly alcoholic.

The class was attended and paid for anonymously by A Sydney Foodie.