Posts Tagged ‘basil’

Harvest Monday, March 2018

Welcome to Harvest Monday, where we celebrate all things harvest related. I’ve been a bit busy with life and work, and I have harvested many things over the summer months. I just haven’t had time to write about it. Not eating completely from the garden, but certainly supplementing what I buy from the shops.

Honey:

About 11kg harvested in February, from Hive no. 2 (Batbox hive). That one was cross-combed like you wouldn’t believe – every single bit of comb built had ignored the directions of the frames, and had been constructed 90 degrees to the frames. No wonder these bees had been bearding all throughout summer, they had built their comb “the warm way”, even though the frames were set up “the cool way”. Stubborn little things!

Honeyccomb March 2018

About 22kg from hive no. 1, harvested in March. This is/was the main hive, the original one – but a few generations along. I managed to harvest a full two warre boxes from this one, probably my first full harvest from this hive for at least two seasons. I had shifted this one away from hive no. 2, so there was a bigger distance between the two and less fighting.

Fwd: Honeycomb

This unfortunately means that this hive is in full shade for most of winter, so honey flow has been a bit slow. About 3 combs were retained to be sold as honeycomb in takeaway boxes (28 of them!), and the rest I crushed as honey.

Cucamelons:
Fwd: Cucamelons

I discovered this vegetable last year through the crop swap, and loved them. Also known as mexican sour gherkins, these are like bite sized cucumbers, and delicious as-is, or in a salad. I got two plants as a swap through the crop swap group, and its lovely to be able to wander around and pick a few when they reach the right size.

Perennial Basil:

Perennial basil

This basil ‘tree’ is about 5 years old. I don’t have the heart to rip out the plant, and the bees really do love the flowers. I notice that if I don’t trim the flower stems back, you get more leaf ‘shoots’ off the old flower stems. So I trim back sections of the basil flowering heads at a time.

Perilla:
Perilla

Also known as shiso or wild sesame. These add a nice flavour to a salad, or are tasty in a freshly wrapped rice paper roll. I used these leaves and the basil leaves to make pesto.

Tomatoes:

Blue Jasper cherry tomato

Blue Jasper. A nice large cherry tomato with a dark green ‘stripe’ on the skin. I have to remember to harvest these before they start to rot. I got the seedlings through the sydney crop swap. I have saved a few seeds for next year, because I do like them. I think I’ve had nearly 1kg worth of tomatoes from one plant.

Sourdough:

Sourdough

I got the sourdough starter through the crop swap group for a jar of honey, and then made a levain which ended up proving for 5 days because life got in the way. After finally making the bread round and proving it overnight, it did rise a little, and I baked it in the oven in my new wrought iron solidteknics pan. It was a nice dense crumb, an almost fruity taste – and hey, I didn’t bake a rock!

Pepino Melon:

Pepino melon

Also known as “tree melon”, the plant started off from a cutting harvested from a Permaculture open day. 18 months later, I have fruit! It is yellow with slight purple/brown stripes. I think the fruit is dependant upon being in sunshine, as an earlier fruit that started growing hasn’t gotten much bigger than a walnut. This one picture is about the size of a tomato or a small apple.

Strawberries:
Homegrown strawberries

There is no fruit as sweet as one picked from your own garden, still warm from the sun. Even ones that have been slightly nibbled by ants or snails (bottom right hand corner).

Other stuff still going in my garden:
I have some promising oranges growing, and I have adopted the neighbours fig tree. I water it, I have put some fruit exclusion bags on it, and I hope to get figs soon. I have also taken looking after the neighbours two orange trees – just watering and de-stink-bugging them when I have time. The place was recently sold by a keen gardener, and it makes me cry to see the inattention and neglect that the new tenants have towards the garden that the previous owner loved so much.

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Harvest Monday, 12 Feb 2017

We are in the middle of a long hot summer. Bats, baby turtles are dying. Not joking. On one day the records were broken, and then we went and broke them again the next day. The cycle is of 4-5 days in the high 30’s (deg C or 95 F+), followed by a 1-2 days in the low to mid 30’s – whereupon it feels positively nippy; and then it repeats. Last weekend, it got to 45 deg C (113 F). It has been horrendous. My garden hates it. I’ve had to rig up shadecloth over the tomatoes; but every time a flower on my random curcubit opens, it keels over and the flower falls off the stem. So it is still a mystery plant.

756 g tomatoes, 200g basil

Harvest Monday 12 Feb 2017

They look pretty; but the taste, not so much. I tried to harvest them in the early morning, such that it was close to 24 hours since I had watered them. I originally picked them to give to a colleague who had been inspired by my tales of sugo making from the last batch, but she wasn’t at work on the friday. So.

My friend is a member of a community garden, and posted photos of her harvesting this amazing looking genovese basil. My basil is a tough mediterranean type that survives winter frosts, but is less green and leafy. It is always in flower, and I can’t bear to cut it back because the bees love it so much. I swapped a 500g jar of honey for the basil.

So I turned the tomatoes and basil into fresh tomato and basil pasta for dinner (using fresh pasta from the markets), and enough for lunch the next day. I didn’t have any balsamic vinegar, so I used a combo of apple cider vinegar and guava vinegar.

The next 100g or so of basil I turned into fresh pesto, with pine nuts and a little lemon juice to try and keep the vibrant green colour.


Curry leaves:

Curry leaves

Not mine, my neighbour’s. He was cutting back his curry leaf plant, and offered me some cuttings. I tried to plant them – but I mentioned this stinking hot weather, right? They didn’t take. So I am currently drying them for later use. They have (to me) an unusual peppery herbaceous taste. I’ve used some leaves to flavour kombucha, as well as make a “curry leaf pesto”. It’s got that peppery taste!