Harvest Monday, 3 October 2016

I’ve been a little quiet on the Monday Harvest posts. Firstly because I’m such a lazy gardener, hardly anything gets planted, thus hardly anything gets harvested.

Right now, I have been “harvesting” bindi. You have to admire the tenacity of the weed. The seeds have a seven year life, and if you accidentally let them get to maturity, the 10+ seeds scatter if you try and dig them out, or they attach themselves to the bottom of your bike tyre/shoe/foot, resulting in the “bindi dance”, as you leap from one ouch to another.

So actual edibles harvest harvest. Mulberries:

Mulberries

Foraged/scrumped from a tree down the road. This brings back memories of turning up late to early morning uni (college) lectures, because I had detoured past the ripening mulberry tree. My hands, of course, were dyed purple as evidence of my dalliance with the fruit tree.

About 4 spears of asparagus.

Parsley and mint. I have a lot of parsley, from when it seeded a few years ago. I have been using a lot of fresh parsley and mint in salads. I have a parsley “lawn”, and every time he trims the lawn, we get tabouli.

Honey!!

Honeycomb

This is the first honey of the season. I only managed to harvest one frame from the batbox bee hive, and this yielded about 5 boxes of honey comb (approx 2.4kg) and one jar of honey with “bits” (approx 500g). This was taken in early September, and only today did I cut the honeycomb up and place it into boxes, mainly to get the plastic crate holding the one frame of honey out of the kitchen.

Planted.
Pepino Melon. Got this one from a cutting during the sustainable house day event at Moss House. Silly me didn’t plant this for about a week after I got it (refer lazy gardener above), and then I chucked it into the south facing bed and forgot to water it.

Sweet pea. It’s getting a bit late in the season for peas, but I had to try. These went into the sunny (relocated) garden bed, with the brussels sprouts and potatoes that I can’t get rid of. A young lady was selling plants at the Moss House open garden to help get herself to Vietnam for some volunteerism (volunteer tourism), and a punnet of pea seedlings was my contribution.

Kohlrabi. My neighbour gave me some seedlings at the beginning of winter. I waited until the end of winter to plant about half of them. I really need to make more time for this gardening business

Native Australian Raspberry.
Probably Rubus rosafolius or maybe Rubus moluccanus. I got this from a crop and swap group, where I swapped a jar of honey, and got some native raspberry canes. I again didn’t plant for a few days. And then didn’t read the instructions about planting with stinky manure in the bottom of the trench. Whoops. I planted it along a north facing metal fence, where the rosebush, oregano, asparagus and rhubarb live.

Battled:

Aphids, aphids, aphids. I got them in my brussels sprouts, kale (cavolo nero), rosebushes and spring onions (scallions). It’s horrendous. I’ve been trying to battle them by squashing them, but the ants keep putting them back. It’s also really hard with the brussels sprouts trying to develop, but I’m tearing the young nodules apart trying to get to the aphids which are hiding inside. I don’t think I’m going to be getting brussels sprouts this year.

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3 responses to this post.

  1. I love the idea of a parsley-lawn! It’s one of my favorite herbs. Thankfully we don’t have bindi here, though it sounds bit like cocklebur.

    Reply

  2. I haven’t run across bindi that I know of so perhaps it hasn’t become too weedy in my area. It’s established in California but perhaps it’s around here yet. Mulberries, oh how I miss the tree that grows in the garden of my last house, they are so delicious. I feel your pain when it comes to aphids, they are a constant in my garden, and the ants too.

    Reply

  3. So fun to read about your gardening season just starting as ours comes to a close. Good luck battling those aphids. Water in a bottle with a bit of soap added does the trick often.

    Reply

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